Ask the family: Mrs CBRbound

Of all the family, it’s fair to say that Mrs CBRbound is the most home-loving. And when I say home, I mean Britain, because that’s what it will always be to her. So it was with curiosity and not the occasional lump in my throat that I read her thoughts on our big move and what it has meant to her.

A close-up pic of Mrs CBRbound.

This week’s guest blogger is Mrs CBRbound.

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Ask the family: Mr Pup speaks

A cockerpoo dog.

Mr Pup still shudders when he thinks of his time in quarantine.

The member of the family who had the most difficult journey to Australia was our family dog Mr Pup. The many weeks of quarantine were particularly hard on him, not to mention us. A full year later, I asked him about his first year in Australia and whether the upheaval has been worth it. Continue reading

Ask the family: Our youngest shares his thoughts

In the second of my guest blogs, nine-year old Mini-CBRbound uses his best handwriting to share his thoughts experiences from his first year as a Canberran. It’s not for the faint-hearted, he paints a good picture of deprivation in the early months after our move, but it perks up towards the end. Mini’s participation bribe was an extra hour on the Xbox – I can hear the squeals of excitement from the rumpus room right now.

A boy leans against the side of a bed while filling out a questionnaire.

Mini-CBRbound adopts a curious writing position to share his views of a year in Canberra.

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A sense of permanence

A few days ago, the CBRbound family went to a housewarming party for some friends here in Canberra. The timing of the event was significant in that it both signalled and echoed our own trajectory as new migrants.

Every now and then, you catch yourself saying something and wonder at the significance of it. While this may sound strange – after all, your own thoughts can hardly be a surprise to you – there is something about articulating them that gives them a slightly different form, and allows you to recognise their existence more readily.

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Global networks

An Emirates Airbus A380, seen through the glass of an airport departure lounge.

The loneliness of the long distance traveller.

I have just returned to Canberra after the second of my regular working trips to Europe. As a freelancer, one of my biggest concerns about announcing our move to Australia was the reaction of my clients. To calm their nerves about whether the relationship would continue to be workable from Australia, I committed to regular return visits. And, thus far, things seem to be working pretty well.

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Canberra confessions

Canberra, seen from Parliament House.

For many, Canberra means parliament and embassies, but for us it has been so much more.

This past weekend has been one of those special ones. You know the type, where nothing spectacular takes place and yet, on the Sunday night, you find yourself looking back and smiling contentedly at the simplicity and happiness of family life.

It brought something else to the surface too – a recognition that the way we think and speak about life in Canberra had morphed from slightly forced, positive thinking, to a genuine appreciation of what we have already built here in six short months.

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Getting lucky in Canberra

A few days ago, I published a post on some of the things that have made a positive impression upon us since we arrived in Canberra.

It wasn’t the kind of list to construct a tourist weekend around. Rather, it detailed all the things that make Canberra so liveable for new migrants – you know, boring but essential stuff such as bike paths, bus services, libraries and so on.
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