The symmetry of leaving

The cover of a book: Living In Australia, Beginner.

Perhaps we are ready for the next book in this series, Living In Australia Intermediate Level?

I’m in Denmark. Exactly a year ago, together with the rest of the CBRbound family, I was preparing to leave an empty house and follow a long-dispatched container of furniture on the long journey south from Copenhagen to Canberra.

We landed in Australia on Hallowe’en and overnighted at a Sydney airport hotel, where a tired and emotional maxi-CBRbound was too shy to say the words ‘trick or treat’ to the check in staff, even though a handful of sweets was on offer to every child who did.

The next morning, we took a final short flight to Canberra, to another empty house and to start a new life. Continue reading

Advertisements

Canberra, city of literature

Four authors sit at a table during a Conflux session.

A panel of authors ready to share their tips at Conflux 11.

As a writer, one of the big attractions of moving to Canberra was the observation from afar that the city had a vibrant creative community and the kind of writers’ networks I could only dream about in Copenhagen.

Over the past few months, I’ve been dipping tentative toes into these waters and have travelled from daunted, to doubtful, to impressed. Continue reading

Street names with a modern twist

A street sign indicating the turn-off for James Kirk Street.

Now that’s what I call a street name.

My early research into the housing market has turned up something unexpected yet entirely predictable as we investigate house prices and neighbourhoods in and around the Canberra suburb of Gungahlin.

I can’t decide whether it’s intentional or accidental, but it seems to me that the people in charge of naming Canberra’s streets have a pretty good sense of humour. Continue reading

A sense of permanence

A few days ago, the CBRbound family went to a housewarming party for some friends here in Canberra. The timing of the event was significant in that it both signalled and echoed our own trajectory as new migrants.

Every now and then, you catch yourself saying something and wonder at the significance of it. While this may sound strange – after all, your own thoughts can hardly be a surprise to you – there is something about articulating them that gives them a slightly different form, and allows you to recognise their existence more readily.

Continue reading